Mansplaining, Womansplained

Since the first presidential debate on Tuesday, the term “mansplaining” has shifted back into the main spotlight following Trump’s incessant interruption of Hillary Clinton. Mansplaining, for those who don’t know, is a term used by women to describe when women are either interrupted or corrected by men unsolicitedly.

During Tuesday’s debate Donald Trump interrupted Hillary Clinton 51 times. He even told her some foreign policy tips, that you know, as Secretary of State, she doesn’t know anything about right? (To quote Trump in his whiny voice, “Wrong.”)

Women in power constantly have to deal with this because a lot of men feel as though even their uneducated opinions weigh heavier than an educated woman’s.

The term ‘mansplaining’ popped up in 2015, but this concept has existed since the dawn of time. Once, a boy at a party tried to tell me that I was pronouncing my own last name wrong. MY OWN LAST NAME.

Well I’ve come up with a solution to the problem. Let’s start womansplaining. Instead of ignoring stupid comments made by men in our lives (sorry not sorry, guys), let’s start correcting them. When someone tries to mansplain you, call them out, and womansplain them. Here’s 3 tips for womansplaining.

The first step to womansplaining is asking for sources: “Where did you read that?” “Are you sure?” “Why do you think that?” “Are you sure that’s not outdated information?”

The next step is to smirk and watch as your opponent in front of you begins to crumble and sweat once they realize they can’t quote Reddit as a source.

The third and final step is to educate; let them know why you believe differently, and why your perspective shouldn’t be dismissed.

To clarify, womansplaining unlike manplaining is not about talking over anyone. There’s no interrupting, or offering unwanted comments. Rather, it’s a response tactic/a way to move forward when mansplaining happens to you.

MANSPLAINING:A societal disease that affects approximately 50% of the population, curable, exists across the globe.Symptoms: uneducated comments, unsolicited advice, and sweeping generalizations. Often paired with a, “Well, actually..” Side effects include: headaches, eye-rolling, society-taught cynicism.

It’s time to fight this disease head on.

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